Graffiti Marathon, Kansas City Style

A Wright read my post on Kansas City Graffiti from 2012 and requested more information. Despite having accumulated a significant library of photographs of graffiti and wall art, I have failed to document where the graffiti is located.  Just for fun, Terry, Casey and I spent time this weekend driving through Kansas City neighborhoods with a cause — help A Wright identify where to look for Kansas City wall treasures.  As a result, I will over the next few days, help locate some fine Kansas City graffiti.  Today, graffiti in an alley.

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Graffiti extends the length of an easily missed alley East of 18th Street between Baltimore and Wyandotte Streets.  It is walking distance of Webster House and the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.   It is a wonderful treasure for those who enjoy urban art.  And, seriously, it appears to me that the alley went a transformation over the course of a few days.  There is paint all over the street itself, and my bet is that no one cares.  It must have been a heck of a weekend!

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Looking closely you will see the initials of various artists and their distinctive styles.  I can’t identify them by name, but I recognize many of the artists from other locations across town.

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If you want to add an interesting dining experience you can enjoy upscale dining at Webster House or eat very casually at YJ’s Snack Bar at 128 W. 18th Street.  However different the environments, you won’t regret either experience.

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In my lay opinion, these are talented artists.  My hat is off to all of them.

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Have a great week.  There is more to come.

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Sunday mornings with Terry–In the shade of Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts

Terry and I are pretty independent souls.  Our work lives keep us busy during the day and our clubs, committees and boards take much of our spare time.  But Fridays after work and Sunday mornings are our time.  Virtually every Sunday morning you will find us in the car with our dog, Casey, with a destination in mind, preferably pet friendly.  We combine breakfast with a drive through an area of the Kansas City metropolitan area that remains unexplored or, in this case, under-explored. This morning was no exception.

It is hot here.  But Casey would not understand if we don’t include him in the morning explorations. That significantly limits the restaurants where we can eat to those that are dog friendly.   He knows, really knows, the rhythm of our lives and which day of the week is for the three of us.  Today Terry selected a restaurant on the North edge of the Crossroads District of Kansas City.  I walked just a block to photograph this  view of Kauffman, Webster House and the Bartle Hall pylons. Y & J’s Snack Shop is eclectic to say the least.  Obviously a haunt for both young city dwellers and middle age professionals , I had never noticed it until this morning.  But it was inexpensive, the food was good, and Casey was content.  The staff even provided water for pets. The aesthetics of the so-called “snack bar” were minimalist at best.  Tiny, with a kitchen smaller than my own, the cook served such standards as bacon and egg sandwiches, coffee and a variety of breads.  The decor was not even shabby-chic, it was just shabby.  The door was covered with stickers of various sorts.  The tables and chairs were plastic and metal.  Nothing really matched.  But the environment was casual and accepting.  Obviously, many patrons were regulars and felt right at home.  Even for first timers it was a happy place to spend some time.  We wandered the block or so surrounding Y & J’S, and were surprised by the variety of retail stores, coffee shops, businesses and an urban garden, all sharing adjoining spaces.  I can’t even tell you the address, because street signs were few and far between.  But one business had prominently displaced its address as 1818 something.  It was a true urban experience made more satisfying because we know it is part of the rebirth of our central city.